Family Law

Qualified Pasadena Family Law Attorney

Experienced Guidance During Difficult Times

Integrity, customer service, and passion; these words are rarely associated with lawyers today, especially when it comes to family law. The lack of customer service in the legal field is what led us to base our firm, the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates, on the principles of integrity and dignity. As advocates for each of our clients, we will fight to protect you in and out of the courtroom.

Following the lead of Pasadena Top Attorney Paul P. Cheng, our firm is committed to providing Pasadena, Arcadia, the San Gabriel Valley, and surrounding areas with competent legal support through the difficulties and confusion found in family law-related issues.

Family Law Cases We Handle

We aid our clients through complex family  legal matters including, but not limited to:

  • Prenuptials
  • Dissolution
  • Modifications of child support
  • Modifications of spousal support
  • Adoptions

Why Should I Hire A Pasadena Family Law Attorney?

Hiring a family lawyer is essential for navigating complex legal processes that involve your family members and protecting your rights. At our firm, our attorneys are backed by years of experience, have a thorough knowledge of California family laws and procedures, provide expert advice, ensure proper paperwork, negotiate on your behalf, and offer strong representation if the case goes to court. With an experienced family lawyer by your side, you increase your chances of achieving favorable outcomes while reducing your stress and potential delays or pitfalls in your case.

Talk To A Seasoned Pasadena Family Lawyer

At the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates, we engage with each of our clients and their loved ones throughout the entire process in order to thoroughly understand each case. Depending on the nature of your case, our Pasadena family lawyer will work with the qualified and professional experts needed to valuate property and analyze assets. Our goal is to settle your case without litigation in court in order to save you time, stress, and money. If litigation is needed, we will work hard to earn a favorable outcome for you and your family. We provide compassionate care and aggressive work in the courtroom to do what is best for every client.

We offer more than just integrity. We offer client satisfaction.

The Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates is available 24/7. Contact us online  for a free in-person, family law case consultation where we will sit down with you to discuss the details of your case and how we can best assist you. We are also available at (888) 356-4937.

Commonly Asked Questions

How does the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates approach family law cases?

At the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates, we take a personalized approach to each family law case. We engage closely with our clients and their loved ones to fully understand the unique aspects of their situation. Our goal is to resolve cases efficiently, aiming to settle outside of court to save time and reduce stress. However, if litigation becomes necessary, we are prepared to aggressively represent our clients' interests to secure the best possible results for them and their families.

Can the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates help with property valuation and asset analysis in a family law case?

Yes, the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates works with qualified professionals to conduct property valuation and asset analysis when necessary in a family law case. This is particularly important in matters involving the division of property or financial disputes. Our experienced attorneys ensure that all financial aspects are thoroughly examined to protect your interests and to provide a solid foundation for negotiations or court proceedings.

How can I get in touch with a Pasadena family law attorney for a consultation?

You can easily get in touch with a Pasadena family law attorney for a consultation by contacting the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates online or by phone. We offer a free in-person consultation to discuss the details of your case and determine how we can best assist you. Our firm is committed to client satisfaction and is available 24/7 to address your legal needs. To schedule your consultation, visit our contact page or call us directly at (888) 356-4937.

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FAQ

  • What are the grounds for divorce in California? What if my spouse cheated on me?

    To file for a divorce either you or your spouse must have lived in California for six months and in your specific county for three months before filing a petition to dissolve your marriage. In California, there are only two grounds for divorce:

    • Irreconcilable differences (which means that the issues in the marriage cannot be resolved).
    • Incurable insanity (Divorce on these grounds requires medical proof that one spouse was insane at the time that the divorce was filed. The insane spouse's condition must also be "incurable.")

    Cheating and being a bad parent are not specific categories for divorce but would fall under the irreconcilable differences category.

  • I have not lived in California for six months. Is there an alternative to divorce?
    Yes, there is an alternative. You can pursue a legal separation without having lived in California for six months or your county for three months prior to filing. A couple who becomes legally separated is still legally married to each other, but the court can still make decisions about property division, child custody and support, and spousal support (alimony). Many couples that have not lived in California for six months or in the county for three months, will file for legal separation, and then when either party has lived in California for six months file for dissolution.
  • What happens to our property after I file for divorce?

    In California, most property will be considered either "community" or "separate." Community property: All property, real or personal, in or out of the state, that either you or your spouse acquired through labor or skill during the marriage is community property. You and your spouse may have more community property than you realize. For example, you may have an interest in pension and profit-sharing benefits, stock options, and other retirement benefits. Each spouse owns one-half of all community property. Even if one spouse worked away from home during the marriage or even if the property is only in one spouse's name, the property will be considered "community."

    Separate Property: Any property that was acquired prior to the marriage or after your separation will be considered separate, and therefore only belonging to the person who acquired it. Inheritance--whether received before or during the marriage--and gifts to you alone (and not your spouse) are also considered separate property. These things will not be divided with your spouse during your divorce or dissolution.

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Let's Take the First Step

Our team strives to provide focused and driven action in order to give your case the focus that it deserves. We are proud to offer each potential client a free consultation. Contact the Law Offices of Paul P. Cheng & Associates today to find out how we can help you achieve the resolution you need.

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FAQs

  • What are the grounds for divorce in California? What if my spouse cheated on me?

    To file for a divorce either you or your spouse must have lived in California for six months and in your specific county for three months before filing a petition to dissolve your marriage. In California, there are only two grounds for divorce:

    • Irreconcilable differences (which means that the issues in the marriage cannot be resolved).
    • Incurable insanity (Divorce on these grounds requires medical proof that one spouse was insane at the time that the divorce was filed. The insane spouse's condition must also be "incurable.")

    Cheating and being a bad parent are not specific categories for divorce but would fall under the irreconcilable differences category.

  • I have not lived in California for six months. Is there an alternative to divorce?
    Yes, there is an alternative. You can pursue a legal separation without having lived in California for six months or your county for three months prior to filing. A couple who becomes legally separated is still legally married to each other, but the court can still make decisions about property division, child custody and support, and spousal support (alimony). Many couples that have not lived in California for six months or in the county for three months, will file for legal separation, and then when either party has lived in California for six months file for dissolution.
  • What happens to our property after I file for divorce?

    In California, most property will be considered either "community" or "separate." Community property: All property, real or personal, in or out of the state, that either you or your spouse acquired through labor or skill during the marriage is community property. You and your spouse may have more community property than you realize. For example, you may have an interest in pension and profit-sharing benefits, stock options, and other retirement benefits. Each spouse owns one-half of all community property. Even if one spouse worked away from home during the marriage or even if the property is only in one spouse's name, the property will be considered "community."

    Separate Property: Any property that was acquired prior to the marriage or after your separation will be considered separate, and therefore only belonging to the person who acquired it. Inheritance--whether received before or during the marriage--and gifts to you alone (and not your spouse) are also considered separate property. These things will not be divided with your spouse during your divorce or dissolution.

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